Tranzyme Pharma is refocusing efforts on TZP-102, it’s diabetic gastroparesis drug treatment, after the failure of it’s flagship drug Ulimorelin.

Tranzyme Pharma & the FDA were not happy with the results of the Phase III trial results for Ulimorelin. Ulimorelin is similar to Tranzyme’s other drug TZP-102, in that it uses a ghrelin receptor agonist to stimulate motility in the gut. The drug was meant to treat people with delayed gastrointenstinal recovery / post operative ileus which is most often associated with gastrointestinal or gynecological surgery. Continue reading “Tranzyme Still Optimistic About Gastroparesis Drug Despite Stumbling Blocks” »

Tranzyme’s TZP-102 is a Ghrelin receptor agonist designed for treatment of Gastroparesis in diabetic patients. Phase IIb trials are currently underway to further test it’s efficacy.

Ghrelin is a hormone that is generated within the walls of the stomach. It’s mainly responsible for the feeling of hunger along with helping to gear up the digestive system for food intake. Leptin is another digestive hormone that is almost the opposite of  Ghrelin in that it promotes feelings of satiety & lowers appetite. Those with Gastroparesis often have problems with loss of appetite & early feelings of fullness along with nausea & vomiting. While it’s known that usually a loss of digestive motility is the reason for these symptoms, it is not often known where the loss of motility came from. In some cases motility is not an issue, yet symptoms remain.  It is possible that those suffering from Gastroparesis may be dealing with an underproduction of Ghrelin or an overproduction of Leptin. It is also possible that these hormone levels are fine but some other issue exists like nerve or muscle damage. Regardless of the cause, increasing production of Ghrelin may be beneficial to those dealing with Gastroparesis as it may allow the digestive system to regain some lost motility while improving appetite & reducing feelings of fullness. Continue reading “Tranzyme’s TZP-102 Gastroparesis Treatment Starts Phase IIb Trials” »

SmartPill device measures patient’s digestive system vitals with less hassle & invasiveness compared to typical diagnostic procedures like endoscopy or gastric emptying studies.

Measuring 26 mm x 13 mm, about the size of a multi-vitamin, the SmartPill device should be easy enough for most patients to swallow. Once swallowed the device gets to work measuring statistics about the patients digestive system. The information collected is useful for measuring motility within the stomach, small bowel & colon along with temperature & pressure throughout the entire gut. A data monitoring device is worn by the patient which the SmartPill communicates with wirelessly. Data is collected for 4 – 5 days & then the patient returns to the doctors office to have the data downloaded & analyzed. Only the data monitoring device is recovered as the SmartPill itself is a single use device & passes through the digestive system along with other waste products. Continue reading “SmartPill Aids Diagnosis of Gastroparesis & Irritable Bowel Syndrome” »

Stanford University’s new Gastrointestinal Pain Program is showing how efficient communication between Gastroenterologists & Pain Management specialists can lead to better results for patients.

It’s all too often that patients with chronic conditions find themselves in the position of treatment manager, coordinating communications between their general practitioner & the multiple specialists they may have to see. Patients in this situation will often feel lost in a sea of doctors appointments, ensuring tests & medical records get transferred properly as well as researching & managing their own illness. Those patients may also feel as though no one in the medical community is really taking a lead in ensuring their wellbeing as often doctors who don’t work within the same medical practice(or even those who do) are distant, with communication not being their strong suit. Continue reading “Communication Key To Managing Gastrointestinal Pain” »

HR 2239 “Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2011” could increase funding for disease like Gastroparesis or Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Visit Functional GI and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2011 on Facebook.

Everyone out there who is dealing with a functional gastrointestinal and motility disorder(FGIMD) needs to listen up & get the word out to their friends, family & especially their local US district representative about H.R. 2239 the “Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2011“. The goal of the bill is to increase funding for functional & motility related gastrointestinal diseases. Continue reading “Please Support HR 2239 “Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2011”” »

A recent study examined the effects the growth hormone agonist, ghrelin, had on Guinea Pig antral and pyloric smooth muscle tissue. Ghrelin is partially responsible for stimulating hunger along with increasing motility & digestive juices. Continue reading “Guinea Pigs, Rats & Ghrelin Helping With Gastroparesis” »

A recent study published in Gastroenterology(Vol. 140, Issue 5) has found that Dronabinol may help with treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome symptoms. Dronabinol is a purified form of THC which is the active ingredient of cannabis(Marijuana).

Patients were split into two groups, one group was given 2.5mg of Dronabinol while the other group was given 5mg. Tests were done to measure colon motility & compliance 1 hour after taking the oral treatment & 1 hour after eating a 1,000 calorie meal. Continue reading “Study Supports Marijuana’s THC Helpful For IBS” »

“Lazy Stomach” article written by a doctor, makes them sound out of touch regarding gastroparesis & patient’s needs.

I am not sure why I didn’t see this earlier, but there was an article posted on DrOz.com about Gastroparesis by Robynne K. Chutkan, MD titled “Lazy Stomach”. The article belittles & seems to make light of Gastroparesis.

The technical term for Deborah’s condition is “gastroparesis” which means paralysis of the stomach – affectionately referred to as a “lazy stomach”.

Who in their right mind actually refers to Gastroparesis affectionately and uses the term “lazy stomach”? Oh “my stomach is just lazy!”, wrong! How about we just leave it at “my stomach is partially paralyzed and/or malfunctioning” which doesn’t sound quite as cute… Continue reading “DrOz.com “Lazy Stomach” Article Angers Many” »

Review: Nature’s Life Betaine HCl – Hydrochloric Acid

Stomach acid(mainly Hydrochloric acid) is an essential part of the digestive process. It is one of the three main things(enzymes,acid & muscle contractions) your stomach uses to breakdown foods into things like sugars and peptides which your small intestine can then absorb.

Hypochlorhydria is a condition where stomach acids are lower than normal or completely absent. The interesting thing about Hypochlorhydria is that the symptoms are very similar to Gastroesophageal reflux disease(GERD). There may be many people out there who are experiencing GERD like symptoms, but the medication they’re prescribed is either not working or actually makes their symptoms worse. This may mean they are experiencing low stomach acid instead of too much stomach acid. Usually doctors do not check to verify if that is the case or not. If you have Hypochlorhydria or you feel you have upper digestive issues related to low stomach acid you can supplement this Hydrochloric acid in pill form.


Bottle Of Nature's Life Betaine HCL
Continue reading “Review: Nature’s Life Betaine HCl – Hydrochloric Acid” »

The FDA recently granted fast-track status for the drug MuDelta which was created by Furiex Pharmaceuticals. MuDelta is a combo delta opioid receptor agonist(stimulates) and a mu receptor antagonist(blocks stimulation). The drug has similarities to another opioid receptor drug Naltrexone, however Naltrexone is purely a opioid receptor antagonist for the mu, kappa & to a small extent delta receptors. It does not have agonist properties and thus doesn’t stimulate any of the receptors.

Continue reading “Furiex’s New Irritable Bowel Syndrome Drug “MuDelta”” »

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