“Lazy Stomach” article written by a doctor, makes them sound out of touch regarding gastroparesis & patient’s needs.

I am not sure why I didn’t see this earlier, but there was an article posted on DrOz.com about Gastroparesis by Robynne K. Chutkan, MD titled “Lazy Stomach”. The article belittles & seems to make light of Gastroparesis.

The technical term for Deborah’s condition is “gastroparesis” which means paralysis of the stomach – affectionately referred to as a “lazy stomach”.

Who in their right mind actually refers to Gastroparesis affectionately and uses the term “lazy stomach”? Oh “my stomach is just lazy!”, wrong! How about we just leave it at “my stomach is partially paralyzed and/or malfunctioning” which doesn’t sound quite as cute… Continue reading “DrOz.com “Lazy Stomach” Article Angers Many” »

Review: Nature’s Life Betaine HCl – Hydrochloric Acid

Stomach acid(mainly Hydrochloric acid) is an essential part of the digestive process. It is one of the three main things(enzymes,acid & muscle contractions) your stomach uses to breakdown foods into things like sugars and peptides which your small intestine can then absorb.

Hypochlorhydria is a condition where stomach acids are lower than normal or completely absent. The interesting thing about Hypochlorhydria is that the symptoms are very similar to Gastroesophageal reflux disease(GERD). There may be many people out there who are experiencing GERD like symptoms, but the medication they’re prescribed is either not working or actually makes their symptoms worse. This may mean they are experiencing low stomach acid instead of too much stomach acid. Usually doctors do not check to verify if that is the case or not. If you have Hypochlorhydria or you feel you have upper digestive issues related to low stomach acid you can supplement this Hydrochloric acid in pill form.


Bottle Of Nature's Life Betaine HCL
Continue reading “Review: Nature’s Life Betaine HCl – Hydrochloric Acid” »

Endogastric Solutions, the maker of the Esophyx device announced on Monday(Aug 30th, 2010) that they had secured an additional $30 million dollars in funding. You can read more information about the Esophyx procedure from my previous post on it.

Thierry Thaure, President and Chief Executive Officer of EndoGastric Solutions commented: “Our technology offers significant clinical, economic and strategic benefits to our hospital and surgeon customers. Over the past two years, the EsophyX and StomaphyX product platforms have been embraced with a high level of enthusiasm by the surgeon community…

Esophyx is a fundoplication device & procedure that does not require incisions and instead is performed completely through the esophagus. Esophyx has come under fire recently for misleading statements & performance. It is marketed as a reversible procedure, but many have been told that their procedure cannot be undone. Additionally some have found no benefit or have had their symptoms worsen after the procedure. There is currently at least one lawsuit claiming Endogastric Solutions has made misleading statements regarding the Esophyx procedure.

References:
Endogastric Solutions Press Release

Esophyx Procedure Reduces Heartburn For Some. For Others The Results Vary

Update: It appears EndoGastric Solutions is in some hot water from the FDA regarding the device malfunctioning, as well as marketing the device as being reversible when in most(?)/many(?) cases it is not. There is also some legal action taking place as well.

Just read about the Esophyx procedure on NBC’s Dallas Fort Worth website. The procedure is offered as an alternative to Nissen Fundoplication.  The goal is to resolve acid reflux symptoms by strengthening the Lower Esophageal Sphincter valve.

Nissen Fundoplication is usually done via laparoscopic surgery, which means one or more incisions are made and a tiny camera is used through these incisions to guide the surgeon. The surgeon wraps part of the stomach around the LES valve and then staples it together so it holds tight around the LES. In some cases mesh devices are needed to help hold the stomach in place. Overall it is a serious procedure with side effects being the inability to belch causing a build of of gas, the inability to vomit, dumping syndrome as well as others. Continue reading “Esophyx Procedure Reduces Heartburn For Some. For Others The Results Vary” »

Exercising for Digestive Health

March 12th, 2010 - Written by - 2 comments

Exercising for Digestive Health

If you’re suffering from a digestive ailment like IBS, IBD or GERD exercise may not be a top priority. Usually digestive ailments leave us feeling tired, sluggish & fatigued. As you probably already know exercise can be very helpful overall for your body in general & can even help symptoms when dealing with digestion. Exercise has the two-fold benefit of helping to cleanse toxins from your body as well as helping to move gas through your system so you feel less bloated.

Knowing Your Limits

This is important. Don’t over do exercise. If you haven’t been exercising recently then you should start off slow. Nothing is more discouraging than going full force into an exercise program and completely exhausting yourself or even possible hurting yourself in the process. If you’re feeling bloated, aching abs are not going to make your abdomen feel any better, nor is having to use the restroom dealing with aching hamstrings.

If you’re dealing with a more serious digestive problem where you are having trouble maintaining weight, you should not be exercising until you have your condition under control. As a general disclaimer, talk to a doctor if you have doubts or are unsure of how to continue.

Easy Low-Cost Exercises

  • Try some basic exercises like windmills, semi circles, running in place or using a jump rope. Basic slow stretching is also good as well. You can create your own 20 minute work-out with these basic items.
  • Walking is your friend. Getting out on a hike if you’re dealing with digestion problems may not be a fun idea, but if you can navigate your local neighborhood 20 – 30 minutes, 3 times a week you’ll probably gain some benefits, plus you might even get a little bit of confidence.
  • Tai-Chi & Yoga are great low impact exercises that can help not only with body, but also with mind. Check out Yoga For Beginners & Scott Cole’s: Discover Tai Chi For Beginners.
  • Inflatable Fitness Balls are the way to go if you plan on working out your core muscles. Balls provide better support for your back and lessen the wear and tear on your abs when first starting out.

Exercise Equipment

Going to the gym when dealing with digestive problems can be nerve wracking, so instead of going to the gym, there is nothing wrong with getting some equipment for your home.

Suggested Equipment:

Keep A Regimen When You Can

Try to keep a regimen or even a log of what you’ve done. If you’re not feeling well, don’t feel bad to skip exercise for that day. Listen to your body. Exercise is here to help, not hurt you!


Hypochlorhydria / Low Stomach Acid Can Cause Heartburn & Indigestion

Many people believe stomach upset, indigestion or heartburn are usually caused by too much stomach acid. This is not always the case & one should not always assume you have too much stomach acid as there is a chance your stomach may not have enough stomach acid.

A Possibly Under Diagnosed Problem

Most doctors, after hearing about a patients complaints regarding heartburn, prescribe a “Proton-Pump Inhibitor”(PPI). Proton pumps in your stomach are what supply the acid that helps digest food. For people who do have an overproduction of acid or have a malfunctioning lower esophageal sphincter(the thing that keeps food/acid from harming the tender esophagus), PPIs can be helpful. On the other hand, people who are producing too little acid may have an increase in symptoms when taking PPIs. PPIs have also been reported to have psychoactive properties, some people become more anxious or nervous while on PPIs due to how they work.

If you are dealing with chronic heartburn/GERD, it may be worth talking to your doctor regarding low stomach acid before accepting a prescription for PPIs. Or if PPIs are not helping you right now visiting your doctor and having a test run for low stomach acid may be a good idea. Many doctors do not run many or any tests before prescribing PPIs.

Treatment

Treatment of Hypochlorhydria is usually a simple supplementation via Betaine HCL pills. Usually you take one pill before a meal and this increases acid in your stomach and hopefully improves symptoms. If symptoms worsen or do not improve, then you may not be suffering from Hypochlorhydria or there are other issues involved as to why you’re experiencing chronic heartburn/GERD.

Digestive Charities You Can Donate To.

Perhaps you’re in the mood to give to a good cause, why not donate to an organization that aids in the advancement of treatments for digestive disorders. I’ve compiled a couple different organizations that could use your support. If you are aware of other organizations I should have listed here, please drop me an e-mail or leave a comment and I’ll add it.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome:

Crohn’s Disease:

Gastroparesis:

GERD:

If you have something to spare, please think strongly about giving to one of these organizations. Thanks.

Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits for IBS/GERD

Apple Cider Vinegar has a lot of buzz going for it on the Internet and the natural health circuit. It can reportedly help with all sorts of problems ranging from gout to heartburn to weight-loss. While a lot of these claims haven’t been proven, I decided to give it a try.

Vinegar is fermented apple juice thanks to yeast helping to breakdown the apple juice to an alcohol & then bacteria break that down into the sour acidic substance we know. Most commercial vinegar we see in supermarket shelves has been filtered & pasteurized, possibly even distilled(clear). If you’re looking for health benefits then you’ll want to skip those & look for Raw Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar. Filtered & pasteurized ciders have had all their “goodness” boiled or strained out of them. Continue reading “Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits for IBS/GERD” »

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